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House of Hope, Columbus, OH

Summary:
For House of Hope, The Durable Slate Company first helped with an emergency dry-in. Afterwards, we replaced numerous slates across the main roof, replaced nearly every valley, reflashed four magnificent chimneys (in copper), replaced the counter flashing and ridge slate, and finish replacing their box gutters (the back row were replaced in 2018).
annaburg manor's new slate roof and copper guttersannaburg manor's new slate roof and copper gutters

The origins of House of Hope can be traced back to the service station of George Conner on North Park Street. He would allow alcoholic men to sleep at his station and encouraged them to seek sobriety. A physician from White Cross Hospital suggested to him the use of the old "Sells" mansion at the intersection of Buttles and Dennison Avenues as a location for a halfway house. In April 1959, members of the Columbus Area Council on Alcoholism, which had been founded the previous year, met to discuss the establishment of a rehab center for alcoholics. This meeting led to the formation of an organization that has been operating since November 18, 1959.

The House of Hope for Alcoholics, Inc. was chartered as a non-profit corporation by the Secretary of State on May 25, 1959. The current House of Hope at 825 Dennison Ave was dedicated as the Thomas Ramseyer House in memory of the former executive director who led the agency from 1983 to 2007. In 1996, an outpatient facility was established to provide treatment services for chemically dependent individuals. In 2012, House of Hope purchased and refurbished a building at 1034 Harrisburg Pike.

For House of Hope, The Durable Slate Company first helped with an emergency dry-in. Afterwards, we replaced numerous slates across the main roof, replaced nearly every valley, reflashed four magnificent chimneys (in copper), replaced the counter flashing and ridge slate, and finish replacing their box gutters (the back row were replaced in 2018).

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More than a roof. A legacy.